MICA Social Design

Projects

Practice-based Studios and Impact Initiatives bring students from a variety of disciplines together with outside partners from government, nonprofit and business sectors to identify opportunities, generate ideas, and make tools for positive social change.

To date, we’ve brought together more than 200 students across 12 disciplines at MICA to collaborate with outside partners on more than 50 projects dealing with issues from affordable housing to HIV/AIDS prevention to disaster preparedness.

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Practice-based Studios

Practice-based Studios bring together teams of MICA graduate and undergraduate students from a variety of disciplines to work in collaboration with outside partners and address complex social problems over the course of a 16-week, 3 credit course.

Impact Initiatives

Impact Initiatives are long-term, multi-year efforts designed to deepen our work with outside partners focused on positive social change in the areas of climate change, education, and health at a local, national and international level. Current partners and projects include:

Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health - Developing training materials and protocol for Baltimore HEARS (Hearing health care Equality through Accessible Research & Solutions).
Johns Hopkins Center for Child and Community Health Research - Increasing access to STI testing and normalizing testing for Baltimore youth ages 15-24.
Behavioral Health System Baltimore - Engaging Baltimore City Middle School students in advocacy efforts around underage drinking in Baltimore.
Baltimore City Health Department - Empowering pregnant women living with HIV through their pregnancy and reducing stigma.

Partners (Past & Present)

Through practice-based studios and impact initiatives, MICA's Center for Social Design has collaborated with many different organizations addressing a myriad of social issues and problems. Among our many current and past partners are:

Arts Every Day, Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore City Public Schools, Baltimore Grade Level Reading, Baltimore Health Care Access, Behavioral Health Systems Baltimore, City of Baltimore, Department of Housing and Community Development, City of Baltimore, Healthy Homes and Communities, City of Baltimore, Step UP!, Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems (bSAS, Inc.), Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, Inc., Great Kids Farm, HERO, Hale Empowerment & Revitalization Organization, Inc., Johns Hopkins Medicine, Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety & Health, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Center for Behavior & Health, Johns Hopkins University, Center for Child & Community Health Research, Johns Hopkins University, Center for Injury Research and Policy, Ken’s Kids, Inc., Maryland Energy Administration, Maryland Responds, National Wildlife Federation, Neighborhood Design Center, Real Food Farm, University of Maryland School of Social Work, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Whole Foods Market

Case Studies

Perinatal HIV

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About

Formed in 1793, the Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) is the oldest, continuously-operating health department in the United States. In collaboration with other city agencies, health care providers, community organizations and funders, BCHD aims to empower all Baltimoreans with the knowledge, access, and environment that will enable healthy living.

Project Overview

There are 2-3 vertical transmissions of HIV in births to Baltimore City residents annually. While out of 9,000 births, this represents a very small percentage of total births in Baltimore City, but it is almost totally preventable. In partnership with the Baltimore City Health Department, In partnership with the Baltimore City Health Department, MICA's Center for Social Design worked to develop design solutions to effectively share prevention messaging with pregnant mothers living with HIV, providers, and hospitals.

Designers

Kayla Ingram, Sena Kwon, Olivia Lindsey, Kristin McCall-Kiley, Caitlin Weber

Ball Magazine

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About

The Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) is an executive department of Baltimore City whose vision is to serve as a catalyst for policy development and change in health and human services.

The Bureau of STD/HIV Prevention is a program within Baltimore City Health Department charged with preventing HIV by providing testing, education, and services focused on HIV prevention. The Bureau of STD/HIV Prevention has worked for over 20 years employing a variety of outreach strategies to increase rates of testing for and decrease rates of transmission of HIV, syphilis and other STDs in these high-risk men.

Project Overview

In Baltimore City, MSM are at significant risk of acquiring HIV and syphilis. According the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration, there has recently been a resurgence in the proportion of newly reported HIV cases occurring in MSM in Baltimore, with a near doubling of this proportion from 15% to 30% in the last 5 years. In the BESURE study conducted in Baltimore City in 2004-2005, 40% of MSM who participated in the study were HIV-positive and 62% of HIV-positive individuals were unaware of their status. According to BCHD surveillance data, rates of syphilis are on the rise in Baltimore City in 2010 compared to 2009.

In partnership with BCHD, MICA will develop strategies that engage the HIV-positive African American MSM population in Baltimore City in order to collaboratively design ways to seek and maintain care, stay on their medication, and maintain safe practices to decrease the rate of transmission of HIV, syphilis and other STDs.

Designers

Zak Bickel, Nick Fogarty, Amy Hushen, Olivia Johnson, Alexander Reynolds

Smoking Cessation

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About

The Center for Behavior and Health (CBH) is dedicated to applying behavioral science principles to prevent illness, improve health outcomes, and reduce healthcare costs.

Project Overview

Develop strategies for building a community of health at Johns Hopkins Bayview, connecting smokers to resources for success, and creating lasting behavior change.

Designers

Faridah Adam, Lula Empis, Joar Heiberg, Amelia Hutchinson, Erin Meekhof, William Tisdale

MD Responds Medical Reserve Corps

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About

MD Responds is the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) for the State of Maryland. The MRC is a nation-wide network of volunteer programs that respond to local emergencies and ongoing public health efforts. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH), Office of Preparedness and Response (OPR) administers the MD Responds MRC. The MD Responds MRC was previously called the Maryland Professional Volunteer Corps (MPVC). The MD Responds MRC consists of health care professionals and community members. The MD Responds MRC coordinates the recruitment, training, activation, and retention of practicing and retired physicians, nurses and other health professionals, as well as other community members. Volunteers with the MD Responds MRC are people who are eager to address their community’s ongoing public health needs and to help during large-scale emergencies.

Project Overview

In partnership with MD Responds, MICA will develop health communication strategies for a public information and volunteer recruitment campaign.

Designers

Trace Byrd, Omar Choudhury, Emily Ianacone, Christal Sih, Lauren Siminski, Anna Spisak

Baltimore Campaign for Grade Level Reading

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About

The Baltimore Campaign for Grade Level Reading is a collaborative effort of funders, nonprofits and public organizations to close the gap in reading achievement that separates many low-income students from their peers; raise the bar for reading proficiency so that all students are assessed by world-class standards; and ensure that all children, including and especially children from low-income families, have an equitable opportunity to meet those higher standards.

Project Overview

Reading proficiency by third grade is the most important predictor of high school graduation and career success. Yet every year, more than 80 percent of low-income children miss this crucial milestone. In partnership with the Baltimore Grade Level Reading Campaign, MICA’s Center for Social Design will engage in a human-centered design process to research and understand the unique challenges around grade level reading in Baltimore and develop a communications and engagement strategy.

As part of this process, MICA’s Center for Social Design will facilitate a series of design workshops engaging Baltimore City families (parents, caregivers, kids, etc.) and key stakeholders (community leaders, teachers, librarians, non-profits, and city agencies) in the development of communication tools, strategies, and messages that promote reading. This process will help build excitement for the launch of a city-wide campaign Summer 2015, and insure that the design and messaging of the campaign resonates with Baltimore families.

Designers

Cary Euwer, Emily Ianacone, Missan Madani, Cally Markovsky, Meltem Sahin, Jen Sullivan, Li Zang

Southwest Partnership

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About

The Southwest Partnership includes Hollins Roundhouse, Pigtown, Mount Clare, Union Square, Poppleton, Franklin Square, and Barre Circle. We aim to address the collective issues of the neighborhoods and assist development and revitalization on a regional scale. We partner with our neighbors, surrounding communities, City government, area institutions, and businesses, knowing that when we take the right road, together and with integrity, everyone will benefit.

Project Overview

A cohort of multidisciplinary designers at MICA will provide research, ideation, and design strategy to the Hollins Market District and Baltimore Street area, developing temporary interventions that demonstrate the area’s potential to become a vibrant social and economic hubs for Southwest. Outcomes will serve as proof of concept for larger commercial development investment. Interventions will be informed by the Southwest Partnership’s extensive community engagement process and will build upon the research and recommendations put forward by urban design and commercial development consultants.

Designers

Kaitlin Jentzen, Daniel Khang,Yushi Luo,Sylvia Mata-Marin, Kajsa Nichols-Smith, Kirsten Poulsen House, Samantha Redles, and Dewayne Whitfield

National Wildlife Federation

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About

NWF’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Center has launched an effort to certify the City of Baltimore as a Community Wildlife Habitat (CWH) as part of a larger initiative to create a ring of certified wildlife habitats around the Chesapeake Bay. Recently the City of Annapolis and the town of Centreville became certified as the 71st and 74th Community Wildlife Habitats, respectively. Following NWF guidelines, wildlife enthusiasts and gardeners have restored habitats from an otherwise fragmented landscape and have collectively reduced stormwater runoff and nonpoint source pollutants in rivers and streams by minimizing or eliminating chemical fertilizers and pesticides, conserving water, and installing rain gardens and rain barrels. Baltimore, with a population of approximately 620,000, will become the largest Community Wildlife Habitat within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. This initiative will ultimately result in the certification of more than 600 homes, 10 parks, and 6 schools.

Project Overview

NWF partnered with MICA to identify the best strategy to activate Baltimore City homeowners (from McElderry Park, Lauraville, Curtis Bay, Pigtown/Washington Village, and Reservoir Hill) to install and maintain rain gardens for the benefit of wildlife, water, and community. MICA worked to develop a strategy and foundation for increasing the adoption of green infrastructure practices on residential properties as it is essential to cleaning up Baltimore’s creeks and streams.

Designers

Byron Banghart, Noah Boyle, Kristine Chambers, Akhil Chugh, Jeremy Doan, Jasmine Touton, Jessica Wen

CARES Mobile Safety Center - Aging Population

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About

In 2004, the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy (JHCIRP) and the Baltimore City Fire Department (BCFD) partnered with other local organizations to launch the Johns Hopkins CARES Safety Center, to help prevent unintentional injury, a leading cause of death for children nationwide. The CARES (Children ARE Safe) Safety Center is a 40-foot vehicle designed as a house on wheels. Inside visitors will find several fun and interactive exhibits that our educators use to show the hidden injury risks in a home and what can be done to protect families.
To date, the CARES Safety Center has been used to reach the parents of low-income, urban children in an effort to education them about pediatric injuries, provide them with the products and services that will assist them in keeping their children and families safe, and raise the profile of injury prevention within Baltimore City. Low-income, urban children are one of two age groups who are at increased risk for preventable injuries; older adults are the other. JHCIRP would like to explore how the CARES Safety Center can be modified and used to reach this new priority population.

Project Overview

CARES partnered with MICA to explore the use of the CARES Safety Center as a way to reach older adults in Baltimore with injury prevention education, products and services. MICA worked to build a strategy and foundation for the development and production of effective communication tools and will suggest modifications or or development of new educational exhibits to target the injury prevention needs of older adults.

Designers

Kyle Peppers, Angela Walker, Karen Shea, Japheth Crawford, Ted Suwalsky

Youth Counter-Ad Campaign

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About

Behavioral Health System Baltimore (BHSB) is the area’s leading expert and resource in advancing behavioral health and wellness. The organization helps guide innovative approaches to prevention, early intervention, treatment and recovery for those who are dealing with mental health and substance use disorders to help build healthier individuals, stronger families and safer communities.

Project Overview

MICA partnered with BHSB to facilitate a series of design workshops exposing Baltimore City youth to design and media literacy through first-hand experiences, relationship building, and a transfer of knowledge and skills. Collaboratively, MICA students and Baltimore City youth created a counter-ad campaign to encourage their peers to think twice before participating in underage drinking.

Links

Oliver Youth Counter-Ad Workshop Facebook Page

Designers

Jessica Crowell, Daniel Khang, Julia Marvel, Yeonoo Shin, Meghan Wittbrodt

LaMocha

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About

The Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Global Health Education (CCGHE) is a center of excellence supporting clinical care and research training in resource-limited communities. In response on our partners’ needs, we collaborate to build educational programs, in-country clinical support tools and distance learning infrastructure that strengthen capacity. We leverage the extensive ongoing international, collaborative research and training programs at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. The Johns Hopkins CCGHE develops and leverages a broad range of innovative information communication technologies (ICT) to support our mission, including e-learning, telemedicine, video conferencing, social media and mobile health applications.

Project Overview

Foreign-born Latino males have a high risk of late HIV diagnosis and presentation to care, which can lead to poor clinical outcomes and ongoing HIV transmission in the community. Late HIV diagnosis is common among immigrant Latino men in Baltimore despite the availablity of free HIV counseling and testing by bilingual Latino health workers in streets, bars and community centers. The objective of LaMocha is to develop a mobile technology application to improve HIV testing for Latino immigrant men in Baltimore.

In partnership with JHU Center for Clinical Global Health Education and the Baltimore City Health Department, MICA is working to increase HIV testing among foreign-born Latino males in Baltimore City. MICA will build a strategy and foundation to develop and evaluate culturally-competent messages for a mobile device program to improve HIV testing among foreign-born Latino men living in Baltimore City.

Designers

Japheth Crawford, Nate Gulledge, Autumn Haac, Tanya Heidrich, Sung Mun, Mike Rich, Iris Sprague, Lizzie Tonkin, Kevin Zweerink

Johns Hopkins Center for Child and Community Health - HIV Action Kit

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About

The development of Protect Baltimore and the HIV Testing Action Kit was made possible by generous funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Category C Demonstration Project (PS12-1201) and collaboration among the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Center for Child and Community Health Research, the Baltimore City Health Department and the Center for Design Practice at the Maryland Institute College of Art.

Project Overview

A collaboration between multi-disciplinary MICA students at The Center for Design Practice and Johns Hopkins Center for Child and Community Health, Protect Baltimore is an educational toolkit for health care professional to promote and practice HIV testing in high transmission areas of Baltimore city. By using methods of ethnographic research, design thinking, and rapid prototyping, the team developed a Baltimore specific HIV action kit consisting of Provider HIV Resource Manual, Patient Info Cards, Provider/Patient Conversation tool, Patient Testing Reminders, Wall Stickers for Clinics and promotional materials. In order to get a better sense of HIV epidemics in Baltimore, the team spent time developing an HIV Glossary, creating data visualizations, interviewing several healthcare providers and spending time at the clinics.

Designers

Heejin Suh, Anne Marie Jasinowski, Karen Shea, Daniel Caldwell, Jackie Littman

Whole Foods Market

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About

Whole Food Company (WFC) opened its doors in New Orleans in October 1974. Its mission was to be a grocery store featuring good, wholesome food; not a “health food” store filled with pills and potions. Whole Foods Market was founded in Austin, Texas, when four local businesspeople decided the natural foods industry was ready for a supermarket format.
Our motto — Whole Foods, Whole People, Whole Planet — emphasizes that our vision reaches far beyond just being a food retailer. Our success in fulfilling our vision is measured by customer satisfaction, Team Member excellence and happiness, return on capital investment, improvement in the state of the environment, and local and larger community support.

Project Overview

Address the challenge of re-purposing of exterior, vinyl marketing banners to keep them out of landfills. MICA will build a strategy and foundation for the development and production of effective ideas and solutions to address the challenge.
The process and outcomes will acknowledge and harmonize with the Whole Foods Market brand promise: To share and celebrate the joy of eating and living well, naturally as well as the Whole Foods Market core values, brand personality, and brand identity. Specifically, the core value focused on caring about our communities and our environment.

Designers

Amanda Allen, Jonathan Erwin, Daniel Khang, Anne Lee, Rachel Ventura

Awards

A Better World by Design 2013 Conference Session, "Behind the Vinyl Curtain: Exploring a Social Design Opportunity with Whole Foods Market + MICA"

Vacants to Value

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About

Vacants to Value, or V2V, is Mayor Blake-Rawlings's holistic approach to grow Baltimore and transform the city's vacancy. V2V facilitates reinvestment in the City’s neighborhoods by streamlining and strengthening the housing market. It supports the City’s economic development by increasing the tax base and creating jobs, preserving and producing affordable housing, providing incentives, and creating mixed income housing opportunities, while the interests of current residents are kept in mind and protected. Slowly but surely, V2V is transforming pockets of blight into thriving communities.

Project Overview

There are over 30,000 vacant properties in Baltimore. After decades of neglect and ineffective programs, many feel that nothing can ever change. V2V is new and novel, driven by a dedicated team. We need to change the perception of V2V and get the facts out in a clear, interesting and personal way. An authentic, truthful narrative will promote and celebrate V2V's many successes.

Links

www.vacantstovalue.org

Designers

Christine Brown, Becky Chen, Maria Chimishkyan, Kacie Mills, Ben Sifel, Katrinna Whiting,

Neighborhood Design Center

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About

Since 1968, the Neighborhood Design Center (NDC) has provided pro-bono planning and design services to more than 1,800 community initiatives that have helped communities build new playgrounds, reclaim vacant lots and abandoned buildings, revitalize commercial districts, create community master plans, and beautify their neighborhoods.

Project Overview

Collaborate with NDC to redesign its brand: infusing new energy, positioning it for the future, and reinforcing the connection to its rich history. NDC needs branding that communicates that it is essential to Baltimore and Prince George’s County.

Links

ndc-md.org

Designers

Amanda Allen, Mira Azarm, Cindy Jian, Noah Boyle and Jackson Lynch

Awards

Sappi Ideas that Matter, 2013

Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems (bSAS)

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About

bSAS is the designated substance abuse treatment and prevention authority for Baltimore City. The organization is responsible for the administration of federal, state and local grant funds for substance abuse treatment and prevention services. bSAS administers funding, monitors treatment programs, collects client demographic and treatment data, works in collaboration with other agencies to improve services, and plans for the development of new services. bSAS does not provide treatment services directly but does provide information and referral.

Project Overview

Collaborate and engage directly with youth (high school and college aged) from the Oliver Community as part of the newly formed Youth Advisory Council. The objective is to work with the targeted demographic to ensure effective communication tools, strategies, and messages. Secondarily, it provides an opportunity for the Oliver youth to experience a first-hand transfer of knowledge and skills around design process.

Designers

Beth Cole, Sean Gardner, Lily Li, Julie Sayo, Becky Slogeris

Recovery Corps

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About

The Baltimore Recovery Corps (BRC) was launched in spring 2011, as part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s StepUp Baltimore volunteer initiative. The Recovery Corps program is designed to provide men and women in recovery from substance abuse with opportunities to “give back” through volunteering to serve as peer-recovery support advocates. The Baltimore Recovery Corps (BRC) is a peer- based coaching and advocacy recovery support service that is non-clinical.

Project Overview

Create awareness and acceptance of the recovery community through de-stigmatization and by increasing visibility while creating and maintaining a sustainable volunteer model.

The campaign, Not One But Many, shows recovery as a movement, made up of strong interconnected individuals. It shows that although recovery is a personal journey, it’s a journey which doesn’t happen alone. It not only gives a face to recovery; but it gives many different faces. Not One But Many also focuses on the different qualities of every person. Someone in recovery is not looked upon as just a former addict, Not One But Many sheds light on all aspects of an individuals personality. It offers many unique perspectives, and shows that even though we all may recover differently, we’re all recovering together.

Designers

Cinnamon Janzer, Angelo Triambulo, Ben Sifel, Tim Collins, Gabe Kelley, Mary Galloway, Harrison Kuykendall, John Clayton, Jessica Crowell, Ben Higgins

Status Update

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About

The Bureau of STD/HIV Prevention is a program within Baltimore City Health Department charged with preventing HIV by providing testing, education, and services focused on HIV prevention.

In Baltimore City, MSM are at significant risk of acquiring HIV and syphilis. According the Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration, there has recently been a resurgence in the proportion of newly reported HIV cases occurring in MSM in Baltimore, with a near doubling of this proportion from 15% to 30% in the last 5 years. In the BESURE study conducted in Baltimore City in 2004-2005, 40% of MSM who participated in the study were HIV-positive and 62% of HIV-positive individuals were unaware of their status. According to BCHD surveillance data, rates of syphilis are on the rise in Baltimore City in 2010 compared to 2009. The Bureau of STD/HIV Prevention has worked for over 20 years employing a variety of outreach strategies to increase rates of testing for and decrease rates of transmission of HIV, syphilis and other STDs in these high-risk men.

Project Overview

Work with representatives from the Baltimore City Health Department to develop and design ways to decrease risky sexual behavior and increase HIV and syphilis testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) at high risk for HIV and syphilis.

Links

baltimorestatusupdate.com

Designers

Noel Cunningham, Aggie Toppins, Nick Hum, Greg Gazdowicz, Bryan Connor, Brian Pelsoh, Jason Gottleib, Abe Garcia

Awards

Core 77 Design Awards 2013

U Choose

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About

B’more for Healthy Babies and the Baltimore City Health Department created the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative. Together with the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA)’s Center for Design Practice, they hope to reduce teen births in Baltimore City by ensuring that young people have access to education, clinical services, and opportunities for leadership and community service.

Project Overview

Increase awareness of birth control options among Baltimore Teens with the ultimate goal of reducing teenage pregnancy citywide.

Links

knowwhatuwant.org

Designers

Lauren P. Adams, Noel Cunningham, Nicki Dlugash, Ben Peterson

Power in Dirt

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About

Power in Dirt will revitalize vacant lots in some of the most blighted areas of the city through volunteer engagement, and get the government red tape and bureaucracy out of the way to make this happen. Residents in Baltimore have already stepped up to turn blighted vacant lots into vibrant community managed open spaces. In fact, there are over 150 of these spaces so far, serving residents in numerous ways, as spaces to gather, to appreciate art, to grow food, to play sports, to just sit and enjoy relief from the built environment of concrete. Crime reduction, improved physical and mental health, improved nutrition, increased property values, and stronger ecosystems are all proven benefits of maintaining, greening, and caring for our physical surroundings.

Project Overview

Promote StepUP, Baltimore’s Cities of Service Plan, and focus on promotion and awareness of the Power in Dirt Initiative.

Links

powerindirt.com

Designers

Becky Slogeris, Andrew Walters

Real Food Farm

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About

Real Food Farm (RFF) is Civic Works’ (Baltimore’s urban service corps and an AmeriCorps program dedicated to building a future for Baltimore’s youth through community service and skills development) new urban agriculture enterprise, located on six acres of Clifton Park in northeast Baltimore. RFF uses sustainable farming methods to grow fresh fruits and vegetables to address the community’s food access issues and promote agriculture as an economic opportunity for Baltimore.

Project Overview

Develop and design ways for Real Food Farm to increase public awareness of and demand for the farm’s products within the five surrounding communities, and to create overall support of the farm’s weekly mobile markets. Early in the project, the team realized there were several ways to increase neighborhood food access:
● Making real food available and affordable
● Creating demand for real food
● Raising awareness of Real Food Farm and its mobile markets
● Integrating the farm into the community
● Becoming sustainable and profitable
● Increasing the volunteer base
● Providing education/youth job training

Links

realfoodfarm.org

Designers

Lauren P. Adams, Bryan Connor, Aaron Fay, Jenna Kaminsky, Chris Muccioli, Kailie Parish, Aura Seltzer, Becky Slogeris

Awards

Sappi Ideas that Matter 2011 & Core 77 Design Awards 2012

Great Kids Farm

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About

Great Kids Farm provides opportunities for Baltimore City school students to understand and participate in every aspect of food preparation—from seed to fork—and prepares them to lead 21st century sustainability efforts. The Baltimore City School system serves more than 85,000 students across the city, and as many as 74% of these students are, given the poverty levels in the city eligible for free lunch programs that directly benefit from the educational experiences provided and farm produce grown at Great Kids Farm.

Project Overview

Increase awareness and generate excitement around the Farm’s activities, specifically among Baltimore City School students K through 12th grade. This experience should also be focused on achieving the ultimate goal of providing every Baltimore City school student with a personal experience at the Farm.

Designers

JT Holly, Benjamin Howard, Zoe Keller, Huong Le, Andy Mangold, Claire Mueller

Baltimarket

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About

The Baltimore City Health Department has developed a Virtual Supermarket using an Internet model to bring healthy eating options to food deserts, areas with limited health food options, as a way to increase food access to City residents to curb the rise of obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease, the number one killer in Baltimore City.

Project Overview

Help research, develop, and produce an effective model for the supermarket and an associated strategy for disseminating information to the targeted audiences.

Links

The Baltimore Sun - Libraries help fill city nutrition gaps

Designers

Lauren P. Adams, Aura Seltzer

Awards

Featured in Graphic Design Thinking by Ellen Lupton

Eat Right Live Well

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Project Overview

Develop and test a series of innovative supermarket intervention strategies aimed at increasing the purchase of selected healthy promoted foods. A two-part research project combining qualitative methodology to inform the intervention and quantitative methods to evaluate the effects of the intervention.

Project included a qualitative formative research study of a) community perceptions of the Southwest Baltimore Food Depot’s business practices and food for sale b) the local community’s attitudes toward eating healthy foods and c) perceived barriers to eating healthy foods. This informed culturally appropriate design solutions and potentially sustainable intervention strategies.

For the intervention study, aspects of the food environment in the Southwest Baltimore Food Depot were manipulated and sales were compared to another Food Depot in a similarly low-income area in East Baltimore. The intervention included three modules focusing on 1) training the Food Depot personnel in how to effectively promote healthy food choices, 2) changing the layout and displays of promoted foods, and 3) implementing a price manipulation strategy to promote consumer trial of healthy foods.

Results from this research aim to help identify strategies that can be disseminated to other supermarkets to improve eating patterns in underserved neighborhoods.

Designers

Lauren P. Adams, Aura Seltzer

CARES Mobile Safety Center

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About

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the Baltimore City Fire Department launched the CARES Safety Center in 2004 to keep children safe from unintentional injury, the leading cause of death for children nationwide. The mobile safety center is a forty-foot vehicle built as a house on wheels, with interactive exhibits and low-cost safety products.

Project Overview

Develop injury prevention educational exhibits materials that are innovative, conducive to learning, and unified to meet the needs of both English and Spanish speaking audiences who visit CARES Mobile Safety Center.

Designers

Lauren P. Adams, Mimi Cheng, Vanessa Garcia, Andy Mangold, Becky Slogeris

Awards

Featured in Designing For Social Change by Andrew Shea

Empower Maryland

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About

The mission of the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) is to maximize energy efficiency while promoting economic development, reducing reliance on foreign energy supplies, and improving the environment. The MEA is currently focused on the “EmPOWER Maryland” initiative, whose goal is reduce energy consumption by 15 percent by the year 2015. To help achieve this goal, the Maryland Energy Administration encourages residents to adopt the combination of energy savings measures that are most appropriate for their home.

Project Overview

Create an educational outreach initiative promoting the “EmPower Maryland” Initiative (15% reduction in energy use statewide by 2015) specifically targeting an often overlooked population: college student renters in Baltimore City.

Designers

Ben Bours, Ryan Wolper, Justin Kropp, Robin Brunelle, Katie McLaughlin

Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) Box

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About

The mission of the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) is to maximize energy efficiency while promoting economic development, reducing reliance on foreign energy supplies, and improving the environment. The MEA is currently focused on the “EmPOWER Maryland” initiative, whose goal is reduce energy consumption by 15 percent by the year 2015. To help achieve this goal, the Maryland Energy Administration encourages residents to adopt the combination of energy savings measures that are most appropriate for their home.

Project Overview

An idea emerged out of the original collaboration between the Center for Design Practice (CDP) and the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA). That idea was the MEA box—a physical, modular installation that would educate the college student demographic about energy efficiency. The installation would become a physical space activating 15 things one could do to reduce personal power consumption and save money. It would also serve as a way for the MEA to gather relevant data on the college students’ energy usage and behavior.

As a follow-up to the “EmPower Maryland” campaign (15% reduction in energy use statewide by 2015), design and develop the MEA box to travel around the state of Maryland stopping at college campuses.

Designers

Robin Brunelle, Ben Bours, Michelle Stidham, Leah Horowitz, Cody Boehmig

HERO

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About

HERO is a community organization that empowers the citizens of Hale County, Alabama and surrounding areas through education and access to opportunities.

Project Overview

Develop a way to disseminate information about HERO to both the internal community and external funders, partners, and volunteers.The design team traveled to Alabama to spend a week immersed into the community and culture and develop a strategy for the project. We worked with the staff at HERO as well as individuals in the community, then traveled back to Baltimore to execute the project.

Designers

Bernard J Canniffe, Ryan Clifford, Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson, Hayley Griffin, Bryan McDonough, Alex Pines, Mike Weikert, Luke Williams

Awards

Sappi Ideas that Matter, 2008

Ken's Kids

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About

Ken’s Kids, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing a sense of purpose and independence to the lives of young adults with cognitive disabilities through job placement and vocational training within the Home Depot stores. The goal is to teach candidates to learn to work independently and to become valued employees. Recently, the organization received funding to widen its reach.

Project Overview

Develop communication tools to help Ken’s Kids, Inc. transition from a regional to a national organization.

Designers

Aaron Talbot, Ryan LeCluse, Julie Diewald, Jillian Erhardt

Healthy Homes

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About

Healthy Homes is a Division of the Baltimore City Health Department created to build a home environmental health program dedicated to reducing health disparities in asthma, lead poisoning and injuries in the City.

Project Overview

Create a lasting, sustainable means of disseminating information about lead safe work practices with the goal of ultimately eliminating lead hazards in Baltimore City.

Designers

Ryan LeCluse, Jillian Erhardt, Christina Nestom, Colin Ford, Ian Scott, Matt Davies, Scott Lowe

Arts Every Day

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About

Arts Every Day is an organization focused on making arts education and cultural experiences an integral part of education in all Baltimore City Schools, through collaboration among the arts, educational, cultural, and leadership communities.

Project Overview

Arts Every Day is an organization focused on making arts education and cultural experiences an integral part of education in all Baltimore City Schools, through collaboration among the arts, educational, cultural, and leadership communities.

Designers

Aaron Talbot, Julie Diewald, Michael Milano,